Cheerio and tootle pip!

Four hectic and busy months have passed since I  signed on for the ‘Social Networking’ summer 2012 campaign, and now my time here ends.

Hmmmm…. wrapping up….. well…. I’ve been mulling over what I would say to sum up my 4 month long adventure exploring the possibilities  of the Mirrix looms.


I’ve made 25 video tutorials, and posted 35 blog posts about the things I have discovered while working with my Mirrix looms.

I’ve figured out some new ways of working with the looms ( ‘s’ hooks for the no warp ends techniques) and enjoyed trying out as many ways as I could think of to use the looms in innovative and creative ways.

One of the loveliest things has been connecting with other Mirrix aficionados and making friends with dear people.

So, even though I won’t be posting here or on Elena’s blog anymore (where all the Weave Along posts are), I will continue to share my love of weaving and my pleasure in using Mirrix looms on my blog: www.tottietalkscrafts.com

Cheerio my friends, tootle pip, and fare thee well!
Happy weaving, go gently, and be well!

Soumak Pouch Weave Along # 8 Part 6- Edging Cords

copyright Noreen Crone-Findlay

Part Six of the Soumak Pouch Weave Along is all about the edging cords for the pouches.
You can use purchased braid like the Kreinik cord  on the edges of this pouch:
The edging is 3/8 ” trim:  # 170 Natural Pewter
http://www.kreinik.com/kshop/product.php?productid=17023&cat=0&page=1

copyright Noreen Crone-Findlay

Or you can make  your own edging cord:

copyright Noreen Crone-Findlay

Starting at the left hand side, the cords are:
Square cord spool knitted with 2 colors on 4 pegs,
Cord Spool knitted with 3 pegs
Kumihimo cords – the directions for how to braid the round cords come with the Kumihimo kit from Mirrix
Tubular Peyote stitch cord- instructions are available in beading books and when you google ‘tubular peyote stitch’.
And last, but certainly NOT least, and definitely the fastest, easiest cord of all to make is the Simple Twisted cord, using the method that I have developed, using a spool and a crochet hook.
You will need a cord that is about 15 inches (37.5 cm) long to go around the sides and upper edge of your pouch.
The instructions for how to attach them to your pouch will be in the final installment of the Weave Along: Finishing Techniques.

Here are some videos that I have made to help you make your decorative edging cords:
How to spool knit a cord with just 3 of the 4 pegs on the spool knitter:

youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLjL1O7kjV0
Sorry! couldn’t get the video to upload, so you’ll have to  click the link… hopefully it will work.

How to spool knit a square cord with 2 colors on a 4 peg spool knitter:

How to make a twisted cord with a spool and crochet hook:

Hope your pouches are coming along nicely!

Onto a good thing!

The Mirrix had not been posted yet, so I suggested going to collect it from the affiliated London shop – The Hand Weavers Studio! David handed me my loom, and showed me a 12″ with a tapestry in progress. He also introduced me to the owner, Wendy, who wished me well and offered to link to my blog on their Facebook page. The first thing I like is that the loom comes already assembled. All you need to add is the warping bar and spring bar, and the shedding device if you are using it (after you warp the loom). There are printed instructions that come with the loom. You can also find PDFs on the Mirrix site with pictures of warping step by step, for each setup – bead weaving with/without the shedding device, and tapestry weaving.

Armed with these two, I warped for my first looming – a bracelet. It was not as difficult as I (for some reason) expected. Once I remembered which way to go round the warp bar and the bottom/top ends, it went quickly. The only issue I had (on my part because I’m spoilt!) was counting the warps. On my other looms, I marked the threaded rod in groups of 10 so I have to do minimal counting. I think I’ll find a way to do the same with this.

I usually loom standing up, even with small pieces such as bracelets. The looms I have also need propping up, even when I, standing, so I don’t strain myself leaning over etc. This loom has legs!! It is a great thing because it stands on its’ own without the need for additional ‘equipment’ to prop it up. That’s a big box ticked for me. I actually tried it sitting. It was ok, but I still prefer to stand. I believe I work faster that way. Anyway with all that rambling, here is what I managed to loom yesterday. It was a late finish but worth it :)

Social Market for a Mirrix

Today, June 1st, marks day one of our four month Social Market for a Mirrix Project. Congratulations to Noreen Crone-Findlay and Brenda Kigozi. Each participant was given a loom in exchange for blogging (as well as posting on social media, making videos and more) about their experience with the loom.

Follow along and learn with them! You’ll see new projects, new tutorials and a great fresh perspective!

Keep up with all the blog posts on our Social Market for a Mirrix blog. You can also follow along on several social media sites and on Noreen and Brenda’s blogs.

Social Media Sites:
Twitter
Facebook Page
Facebook Group
Ravelry
Weavolution
Pinterest
YouTube

Follow their blogs:
Noreen: http://tottietalkscrafts.com/
Brenda: http://brendakbeading.blogspot.com/


Follow them on Twitter:
Noreen @NCroneFindlay
Brenda: @BKHandcrafted!

Social Market for a Mirrix Video #18

If you would like to continue to follow me on my journey through life exploring collage, fiber and textile art, marketing for artists, the art scene in Santa Fe, etc. you can connect with me at…

Facebook Profile or Page
Thanks for joining me on the “Social Market for a Mirrix” campaign.

Social Market for a Mirrix

One of my loves is mask making… the use of masks by indigenous cultures, the symbolism of masks, the masks we hide behind every day as we journey through our lives. So, for some reason, it seemed appropriate to end “Social Market for a Mirrix” with one of my mask collages utilizing one of the weavings completed during the campaign.

This collage / assemblage isn’t finished yet but it will be completed in time for the final video on Monday. Once the paint is dry, I’ll be able to pull the pieces together relatively quickly.

As promised, I’ve put together a resource list of vendors I’ve worked with and can personally recommend. So, in addition to the equipment and supplies offered by Mirrix, you might want to check out the following:
Professional Organizations
Weaving Supplies
Books, Magazines, etc.
Online Communities
When purchasing supplies, please try and support the smaller, independent sellers in your area or online.
Some of my favorite weavers…
And so Claudia and Elena can track any direct ROI for the “Social Market for a Mirrix” campaign, please leave a comment if you purchased a loom or supplies from Mirrix as a result of this campaign.

Social Market for a Mirrix

Remember this piece? The first weaving I completed in the “Social Market for a Mirrix” campaign? The piece I keep referring to as the Southwestern landscape?

Well, it grew up to be this piece. And now it’s finished and ready to go to its new home.


I took the original weaving and beaded the bottom half to give it the illusion of flowers. Then I tied off the warp threads leaving them long enough to form a fringe at the bottom of the weaving. And the warp threads at the top of the weaving were left long enough to hang down to form a veil. I like that the veil breaks up the surface of the weaving and makes the viewer have to work with the piece a bit to understand it. I attached the weaving to a canvas board that had been covered with rice paper and painted with metallic acrylic paint then topped off with iridescent watercolor. I finished the piece off by embellishing it with an old Southwestern style earring. All things considered, I’m pretty happy with how this piece turned out.

One down, two more to go. Tick, tock!

Social Market for a Mirrix



I’m currently working up the left side of the weaving and starting to level it off so I can cut the weaving off the loom. I’m also trying to finish off the two remaining pieces that were completed earlier in the campaign so I can get those posted by the end of the month.

Susan left a couple of questions for me on my blog…

What tapestry books do I recommend and do I have a favorite?

Based on personal use, I can recommend “Tapestry Weaving: A Comprehensive Study Guide” by Nancy Harvey, “Tapestry Weaving” by Kirsten Glasbrook, and “Shaped Tapestry” by Kathe Todd-Hooker. Those are the ones I have sitting on my bookshelves. I think the Glasbrook book is an excellent guide for beginning tapestry weavers to start with. Harvey’s book is more detailed but it’s also out of print.

The American Tapestry Alliance offers a distance learning program, Helping Hands, designed for beginning weavers who want to explore tapestry weaving with guidance and mentoring from a more experienced tapestry weaver. The details are available on the American Tapestry Alliance website.

What do I like best about the Mirrix Loom?

I really like how easy it is to warp the loom and to be able to get sufficient tension on the warp threads. The coils make it easy to keep your warp threads evenly spaced. I also like the fact that the loom has a nice solid feel to it and it doesn’t wobble, shift, or slide when I’m weaving.

Social Market for a Mirrix

We’re quickly approaching the end of the “Social Market for a Mirrix” campaign. Only 3 more blog posts and 2 more videos before I ride off into the Southwest sunset.

You’ll see there’s been a bit of progress since the last posting. And that orange section in the middle is still bothering me but I’m trying to let it go. If you look at that section on the far right of the weaving, that’s approximately 1/3 the height of the cartoon so this weaving definitely won’t be finished by the end of February. But, it’s coming off the loom at the end of the month no matter where I’m at in the weaving in order to be incorporated into a collage. To be honest, it will probably be far more interesting in an unfinished state.

Right now the plan is to start to level the weaving off so you’ll have a better idea how it would look. I’m finding myself making a lot more adjustments now, especially with the black areas. Actually, now that I’m looking at the picture and have some distance, I think I would be a lot happier with that orange section if I had separated it from the brick red with black.