New Kit in a Basket

Just for fun!  We’ve created a new kit in a basket that is both great for giving to others and to yourself! It includes: lots of beads and hand-painted silk and gold thread and tools and crystals.  You can make a variety of fiber and/or bead projects of your own design or following some of the weave-alongs we’ve already posted in this blog.


Gold thread, C-Lon cord, C-Lon beading thread, Hand-painted silk, Chenille, novelty yarn.
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11/0 seed beads, 8/0 seed beads, bead and crystal soup, mother-of-pearl buttons, glass leaves.
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Scissor, 5 inch tapestry needle, tulip beading needles.
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One gorgeous small Bolga basket.
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Price:  $150
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What is a Shedding Device?

The Mirrix Shedding Device can seem a puzzling contraption to those unfamiliar with weaving. Today, I hope to clear up what a shedding device is and why you might want one.

sheddingdevice

The Mirrix Shedding Device

Called: Shedding Device
Not Called: Shredder, Shredding Device, Shedder

Shedding devices are devices used to lift warps in order to pass fiber or beads through them more easily. The space between the warps is called the SHED, which is where the term SHEDding device comes from.

On a Mirrix shedding device, when you change the position of the handle, the shedding device shifts position and opposite sets of warps are raised, securing your beads or weft between the warp threads. The wooden clips hold your shedding device on the loom, but also serve to hold your warping bar in place when warping your loom (and before you install the shedding device).

shedding device

By changing the position of the shedding device using the handle, you change which warp threads are raised or lowered

When weaving tapestry, if you do not use the shedding device, you must weave each piece of fiber under and over the warp threads.

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By using the shedding device, you can lift half of your warp threads all at the same time, so instead of weaving over and under, you can just place your weft (the thread you are using) between the raised and lowered warp threads.

shedding device

The shedding device is attached to the warp threads with heddles. These heddles pull up on the correct warp threads when the shedding device is engaged.

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The shedding device engaged in one direction, picking up half the warp threads.

When weaving beads with the shedding device, you string up a row of beads and then place them between the raised and lowered warp threads. Then you change the position of the shedding device, securing those beads between the warp threads.

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bead weaving

On a Mirrix Loom, using the shedding device is recommended for tapestry weaving as it makes the process much faster and easier. For combining beads and fiber, a shedding device is also very useful. For beads, both the traditional bead weaving method of placing your beads behind your warp threads and then sewing through and the method using the shedding device and placing the beads between raised and lowered warp threads work. The method using the shedding device takes a little more time to set up, but once you get the hang of it it’s a fast and fun way to weave beads!

Do you still have questions about the Mirrix shedding device? Ask in the comments!

New Gold Thread

Just received some gorgeous coppery-colored 14 karat gold thread.  I thought it would be fun to mix the gold-gold and the coppery gold and I was correct.  The combination is stunning.  I have wound some of this onto bobbins.  The amount is still 75 yards, but doubled so in fact it’s 37 and 1/2 yards of each thread.  I think many of you double the gold thread anyway when you use it, so this will make that option easier.  If you are interested in purchasing these ($15 for 75 yards or $25 for 150 yards).  You can now find it on our online store:   http://www.mirrixlooms.com/store/14karatgoldthread.html#goldthreadtwoshades

Now for the pictures!

 

Those Pesky Heddles

For many, putting heddles on the loom (heddles connect your warp to your shedding device) is the most challenging part of warping simply because it’s easy to make a mistake. Even after warping and heddling many, many looms, I still make my fair share of mistakes.

The key is: patience. You can’t put your heddles on in a rush or while watching TV or while having a conversation with your friends. Trust me, I’ve tried, and usually when I do that I make a mistake. In the long run, it’s a lot easier if you take your time and make sure every heddle is on the right warp thread because one crossed heddle or one missed heddle means you’re going to have a lot of not-so-fun troubleshooting ahead of you.

Although you still should follow our warping instructions (the .pdf can be found here: http://www.mirrixlooms.com/warpinginstructions.html) I made a few small diagrams that might be helpful to see how the heddles should be put on your loom and what mistakes you might make.