Look Ma, No Warp Ends!

After previewing this lesson, I was actually a little nervous about getting started. Just when I was beginning to feel confident with the ease of bead weaving in the previous lessons, I would now have to actually do something drastically different. Those innocent-looking paper clips and tex-solv cord seemed more than just a little intimidating. Well, fear not. I’m here to tell you that like everything else so far in this course, the learning curve is swift and before long I was on my way.
 
 
 
I will admit to making good use of the thirty second replay button that Craftsyoffers. After several replays, I finally realized that TWO lengths of tex-solv were necessary. Duh! (This was also a good time to actually READ the course material provided.) Getting all the new cords adjusted and evened  out was a bit of a challenge but once the paper clips were in place, the warping was surprisingly painless. I’ve since watched my fellow blogger Noreen’s excellent video tutorial where she uses S-hooks in lieu of the paper clips. (http://tottietalkscrafts.com/2012/06/22/a-slightly-different-approach-to-the-no-warp-ends-on-the-mirrix/). I may try that next as my biggest difficulty was figuring out which direction to actually place the paper clips. Again, not a huge problem but using the S-hooks will eliminate that confusion. As Claudia promised, the actual weaving part is lightening fast and in no time flat, I had completed another beautiful fully beaded cuff.


Now who doesn’t love the final result? Really…no warp ends to deal with! This is just genius, don’t you think? The strength that using the wire warps is a bonus as it gives a very professional look. I also love having the option of choosing how to finish the bracelet with either the peyote clasp or by using an unusual or vintage button as I did. How cool!
 
Off to the hardware store to purchase S-hooks. I may never use real warps again.
 
xxx, Karen 

 

 

Magnatamas, Tilas & Silk, Oh My… Plus A Quick Tip

I’m really cooking now. Finished the latest Affinity Bracelet in under thirty minutes and that includes warping! They’re just so easy. Using the no. 8 beads again makes bead weaving a breeze. There’s plenty of room to squeeze a needle and thread through without nasty mishaps like catching warps. The tilas are fun and aptly named- they resemble little rows of tiles. My favorites though are the magnatamas-they look like little pudgy off-centered donuts. Love ‘em. Although I’ve seen them at the bead shop before, I now intend to purchase lots more and play around with design possibilities. Anybody know why they’re named such? Just curious.
What I’m really excited about though is the ability perhaps to teach you all something…me teaching you, for a change. Many weavers might already be familiar with “fringe twisters” but in case there are some newbies who are not, read on.
3 Clip Fringe Twister
These magical little thingies are a life saver when you need to make lots of fringe. I first spotted them at the many sheep and wool festivals that I attend. Again, I guess they’re more of a fiber thing. Smart knitters use them regularly to assist in the tedious chore of finishing the fringe at the end of scarves. The most popular ones I believe are made by Leclerc although there are other brands. (http://www.leclerclooms.com/twister.htm). They come in various sizes and run about $25 depending on the size. Trust me, they’re worth every nickel. The one shown here is designed to make a three-strand fringe however if you only employ only two clips, as I do here, you can use it for the two-strand fringe necessary for this bracelet.

The how-to? Simply insert each strand of fringe into its own alligator clip. Turn the handle in the same direction as the twist in the thread/yarn. Count you turns until you’ve reached the desired crimp. Next you must place all strands into the same clip and turn in the handle in the opposite direction. Again, you should count the revolutions to maintain consistency between all fringes. When the twist in the resulting rope is to your liking release the strands while holding the ends together and knot. That’s it. (It takes longer to explain than actually do).



Perfect fringe, every time!



What’s wonderful about this tool is that you get tight consistent fringe every time. Although I was initially unsure if it would work on such a tiny scale as these bracelets, I was thrilled to learn that it works perfectly. No more twisting delicate fibers between your fingers or accidentally letting go. It’s really almost hands free and takes a fraction of the time as traditional twisting by hand.
(Note to Claudia & Elena: you should stock these babies. Very useful).
Off to the beach again. When you live on Long Island, you go to the beach. And haven’t you heard? Summer’s almost over. (sniffle sniffle)
xxx, Karen  

Bead Weaving: A Love-Hate Relationship

Craftsy Class 5: Affinity Bracelet Variations
 


The second Affinity Bracelet variation uses 4mm crystals & hex-cut beads. Besides being entirely bead woven, it employs the technique of substituting a larger bead for two smaller ones in specific rows. As Claudia explains, one can always replace any two smaller beads with a larger one if the larger one is exactly twice as long and wide as the two smaller ones. Pretty cool concept if you think about it and it opens up a world of creative interpretation using a variety of beads. Of course now I can imagine obsessively trying to measure all kinds of itsy bitsy roll-y beads. (Thanks, Claudia). Then again, I suppose I can just eyeball them and hope for the best which is really much more my usual m.o. anyway. 

I admit to starting this project with a little trepidation. With all due respect to the fabulous bead weavers reading this (you know who you are. I won’t mention my fellow blogger, Brenda’s name here), I’m just not a big fan…not for myself, at least. Lots of blinding work weaving with microscopic beads and where’s the fiber anyway? By know you must know that I always need my beautiful fibers. For this reason, I predict that I will be more of a tapestry girl. I can’t wait to begin the Tapestry Cuff but I really must complete the lessons in their proper order and that one, sadly, is last.


Several missteps thwarted my initial attempts. I kept splitting the bead thread and piercing (or missing entirely) the warps. Very frustrating. The ability to count to six posed a problem as well. (Hey it was after 10PM when I started…first mistake). The other thing I learned about bead weaving is that you need amazingly good light. In fact, more light than I have in my entire house- at least at that late hour. Note to self: must save these projects for daylight hours only or suffer the consequences. Still, I forged ahead…straight through David Letterman. As Dave said goodnight, so did I. With a mere 16 bleary-eyed rows completed, I called it quits. “G’night folks,” as Dave says. Yeah, I’ll say.



Stealing some time from my lunch break the following day (who needs to eat anyway? Not me lately…but that’s an entirely different blog post topic), I took my loom outside and was able to finally make some serious progress. I really love how the beads line up in this pattern and my choice of lime green silk warp matches my green 4mm beads to perfection. (Almost like I planned it but we know better). The four row pattern repeat, as we knitters would call it, is an easy one to remember and after a short while comes quite naturally.



I find that the near-instant results seen in these bracelets are incredibly gratifying. Within a very short period of time, you’ve completed another little work of art. Fabulous!

As I’m beginning to expect from Mirrix, this bracelet has turned out to be another winner. This really is becoming addicting.

xxx, Karen

Gold, Gold Everywhere!

Craftsy Class 4: Gold Thread & Hex Bead Bracelet
If I thought I loved the hand painted silk floss introduced in Class 3, that was before I discovered this gold plated “wonder thread” in Class 4. What IS this fabulous stuff? Claudia describes it as a silk base with real gold fused to it. Whatever it is, it weaves up fabulously and really does in fact look like the real thing. That’s the good news. The bad news: Don’t let this happen to you:
Gold Thread…Before



Gold Thread…After



Really, I should have known better. After all the various yarns I’ve wound, skeined, unwound, untangled, got-so-frustrated-and-thrown-away, over the course of so many years, you’d think I would have done a better job with this one. And it’s not that I wasn’t prepared. “It’s got a mind of its own,” Claudia warns. Yep, it sure does. (It’s like letting a tightly wound spring out of a small box). And it surely is one of the finest threads I’ve ever encountered- it’s nearly invisible. So now I’m warning YOU: take your time and be patient with this stuff because it is all so worth it. Once you do get it wound and threaded on the needle, it’s a breeze to weave with. In fact it practically weaves itself. And it is also very forgiving as it fills itself in almost magically. Just be sure to keep those six plies together. As far as the hex beads are concerned, after using the larger size 8s for the Affinity Bracelets, these smaller beads seem a bit more challenging but you’ll see that it’s nothing unmanageable. Of course, I had to add my own personal spin to the finished product by adding a little bit of purple/pink mulberry silk between the gold and the beads. I kind of like it, what do you think?  



The finished bracelet



Weaving at the beach…the best of all possible worlds!



So, Class 4…Just stay calm, keep at it and you’ll get a truly beautiful result. And be prepared for lots of requests from friends for this one. It’s a stunner!
Now onto Class 5. See you there.
xxx, Karen

Mirrix Goes to Montauk

As it happens, my Mirrix loom arrived the day prior to our little holiday in Montauk. (I know you’ve heard of Montauk Point. You know, at the very tip of Long Island, NY?)  Well, I couldn’t leave her home alone, now could I? Certainly not with all that fabulous fiber haunting me from afar. So, unbeknownst to the family, I sneakily stuffed her into yet another canvas bag and she made the two hour trip to the beach. Here she is on the deck overlooking the Atlantic Ocean looking rather majestic, don’t you think?

Craftsy Class: Introduction & Looms

Claudia’s introduction, besides doing a great job of whetting one’s appetite, speaks for itself. Not much need for comment, I believe. The second “lesson” concerning various looms is significant particularly if you are not yet fortunate enough to own a Mirrix. (Notice I say yet. Don’t worry, you will). Prior to receiving the Mirrix, I fiddled with both a $10 craft-store seed bead loom as well as my Cricket, both with excellent results. They really do weave beautiful bracelets. However, tensioning problems as well as awkward warping renders them less than perfect. Learning to warp a Mirrix is a snap and the tensioning is a dream. I think the Volkswagen/ Mercedes analogy applies here; there’s simply no comparison. If you can, by all means, get a Mirrix!
  
Craftsy Class Lesson: The Silk and Bead Affinity Bracelet

I have a thing for silk… always have. It is by far my favorite fiber to work with, be it knitting, crochet, sewing or weaving. I love the tiny little crunch it makes when you fondle it which I confess I do. The vibrant colors that Claudia has created make all the difference in the final product, I can assure you. Not wanting to waste the precious silk, I practiced my first few Affinity Bracelets using lesser fibers- some pedestrian embroidery floss and even some commercially dyed silk floss. I can tell you that they can’t compare to the subtle color variations of Mirrix hand painted silk. (Pssst, Claudia, have you considered offering a silk dyeing workshop? Hint hint.)

I wish I could write about some problem or difficulty that I encountered while attempting to weave but honestly, it is so simple and enjoyable that I cannot find anything to critique. Ok, my selvedges are less than perfect and I probably could use a pair of magnifying glasses to thread that blasted bead needle but that’s about it. Come to think of it, I’m not crazy about that peyote stitch yet either but I’m sure that will improve with more experience. Heaven knows, I’ve got a long way to go.

When one chooses to forego an afternoon at the beach in order to stay back to weave, I think that’s really saying something. Here are my results. Whaddaya think? Not bad, eh.

xxx, Karen

Hello, Gorgeous!


For those of you too young to remember, this is precisely what Barbra Streisand uttered upon being handed her first Oscar statuette after winning the Academy Award for Best Actress. (I won’t embarrass myself by revealing the year…perhaps you remember? Don’t worry, I won’t tell.)


Whatever does this have to do with weaving, you might ask? Well, if you’ve ever had the joy of setting eyes upon your first Mirrix loom, this will pretty much be your response. It was surely mine last evening when I opened my glorious and much-anticipated package from Mirrix. And although I’ve certainly seen enough photos and videos of them, to hold a Mirrix Loom in my very own hands is quite a different experience. Trust me, they’re absolutely gorgeous.

To back up a little…I must admit to my surprise upon learning that I had won the Social Market for a Craftsy Class contest. After all, I’m certainly not much of a weaver. And although I’ve woven a fair share of some lovely yet rather simple items on my Ashford and Cricket rigid heddle looms and even on a ginormous 7 foot triangle loom, until recently I had never heard of Mirrix Looms. I am however a Very…Serious…Knitter, having owned two different yarn shops over the last twenty years. During this time, I have taught untold numbers of classes to countless students of all levels and have blogged about the trials and tribulations of owning one’s own knitting shop. Just two years ago, after selling my most recent beloved yet truly exhausting yarn shop, I was fortunate to land my dream job as the Marketing Manager at Knitting Fever. Perhaps you’ve heard of us? We are the nation’s largest importer and distributor of many fine yarn brands including Noro, Katia and Debbie Bliss. In this position, not only do I design knitting patterns but I often get to help develop the actual new yarns that will be brought to market each season. Very exciting stuff, I can assure you. So, if there is anything I do know fairly well, it is fiber.

Enter Claudia’s Craftsy class, Bead & Tapestry Cuffs. Upon first discovering it, it appealed to me immediately. Naturally, I was captivated by the unique fibers used in the Affinity Bracelets and of course, the magnificent Bead & Tapestry Cuff. Just one quick glance at the extravagant materials shown in the class promo, I knew I was hooked. Hand-dyed silk, golden threads and beads of all sizes and shapes. (Be still, my beating heart!) But I am getting ahead of myself…I must first finish opening this fabulous Mirrix package because there are LOTS more goodies in here to unearth. Stay with me while we embark on a fascinating, fiber-filled weaving adventure, won’t you?                        

 xxx, Karen



Weave-Along Week Three: Weft Interlock


Time for some weft interlock.
Using some scrap yarn, divide your warps into roughly four evenly spaced sections.
Insert your four wefts going in the same direction, from left to right.  Then head back to the right starting with the weft on the right.  When you weave the second weft, catch it around the first weft and weave.  Do this with the following two wefts.  Essentially, the wefts, where they meet, loop around one another.  The line between the wefts will be in between warps making this very different from warp interlock, where you wrap your weft around the same warp.  With weft interlock, which is frequently used in Navajo technique, there is less building up of higher weft areas where they interlock making it a better technique for building up straight lines.  The best technique is obviously slit technique where there is no build up, but then you have those pesky slits to sew up.
Next weave back from right to left.  Your wefts are already caught around one another so you are just weaving back.
The next step is to weave from left to right, catching the wefts with one another until you get to the right side of the weaving.
Continue this process with the next wefts.   Weave until you’ve built up about half an inch.
End your wefts except for the far right one.  Weave that back to the left slightly and replace it with two silk wefts.

Add two silk wefts and weave for a bit.  Then replace with single silk weft.

Add a row of beads.

Weave a the silk weft.

For a bit!

Add another color of single silk weft.  Weave for another bit and then add another row of beads.

Continue with some single silk weft.

Add some railroad yarn to the silk weft.

Weave a bunch of it.

Add some single silk weft.  The double it up.

Weave some doubled silk weft.

Change it up a bit by replacing one silk weft with a new color.  Play!

Play with some of these techniques (maybe try those fun squares again) until you’ve woven another four inches!

Silk Purse Weave-Along Week 2 (Weave-Along 7)



If you have a bottom spring kit, as I do here, start weaving your header.  If you don’t have a bottom spring kit, cut a thread three times the width of your loom.  Engage the shedding device, weave it to the threaded bar, wrap it around the threaded bar, change the she and weave it back to the other threaded rod.  Tie the two ends tightly around the threaded bar.  This will serve as a base for starting your weaving.  Make sure the two threads make a straight line.  Arrange the warps so that they are evening spaced at ten ends per inch.   Then begin weaving a header.
Two weave a header:  cut a manageable length of warp thread and weave it back and forth for about a third of an inch.  This header will be folded over to the back of your weaving when you finish your piece.  Be mindful to not pull too tightly at the sides of your weaving but also to not leave loops at the edges.   Beat it down with a tapestry beater or, if you don’t own one  a kitchen fork.
End your header about six warps in and begin a weft of just silk where the header ends.  Remember, you always want your ends hanging to the back of the piece.  You will begin new threads when old ones end, if possible.  The back will not show.  It will be lined in silk.  So it can be a complete mess.
Thread a beading needle with beading thread.  Tie a knot so that it forms a loop.  Loop the silk weft into the loop and load your beads onto the needle.  They will easily slide onto the silk weft.  Place the strung beads into the shed (the space between the raised and lowered warps) and push them down into the V.  Pull tightly on the silk weft so that there is no loop at the end and it is wrapped snugly against the opposite warp thread.  The beads are hard so they will prevent your from pulling in at the edges.  In fact, if you warp was at all uneven, the beads will even everything out nicely.
Warp the silk around the warp thread to keep that last bead in place.  Change the shed and weave the silk weft to the other side.  Weave until your run out of weft and then begin a new color where the original weft ended.  Weave that color for two passes.  You are now ready to add a second and third color.
You will be inserting these two additional wefts in opposite directions.  The second weft (the salmon colored weft in my example) will head toward the existing turquoise weft.  The sage weft will be headed away from the turqoise weft.  By doing this, your wefts can cross into each other’s territory and still be in the correct shed.  This is a kind of difficult concept to understand before you’ve played with it.  So now that we’ve got our silk wefts in place, let’s play with them.
Weave the sage weft into the salmon wefts territory but don’t go past the tail of the salmon weft.  Weave the salmon weft back to meet the sage weft, wrapping around a common warp.  Weave the turqoise weft back to the right.  In this case, I’ve wrapped it around the next door warp but could have wrapped it around a common warp.
Keep playing with this method for a while.  I will show you pictures of each row I weave.  As I mentioned, you can either wrap around common warps or not.  For this technique it makes little difference although one does have a natural tendency to wrap around common warps.
You have just learned how to:
Weave several wefts in opposite directions.
Create shading.
Create shapes (note the salmon shape you’ve created).
To end the three wefts, first weave the right ones toward each other and end them by sticking their ends to the back of the weaving.  Then weave the left weft to the left warp.  Weave it until it is used up and then replace it with an entirely new color.  I used the color we began with.  Weave a few passes and then thread with beads and weave a row of beads.
Weave the silk weft until it runs out.  Add another silk weft and weave a couple of rows.
Add some railroad yarn to the silk and weave the two at the same time.  This will add both texture and some great color to your piece.
End the silk/railroad combination weft and replace with two different colors of silk also to be woven at the same time.
Next we are going to weave sections of diagonal shapes.  End the double silk weft by wrapping around the outside warp so it hangs to the back of the piece.
My piece is 40 warps so I will make each shape 10 warps wide.  The best way to guide yourself through this is to stick markers in the warp so you can see where you will begin and end a shape.  You are going to be weaving these four single silk wefts in the same direction.
Start like this:  The four wefts begin and end where the markers are.
Weave the right weft to the left first.  Weave the next three wefts in order to the left.

Next, weave the left weft to the right but weave over one more warp.  Do the same for the other three wefts.  The goal is to create a diagnol shapes by weaving over one warp when you go to the left and reducing by one warp when you weave to the right.

Follow the pictures.  Your left shape is gong to get bigger and bigger whereas your right shape is going to shrink.

At some point you can remove the guide threads as they won’t be necessary.

To end the left weft wrap around the end warp so it is hanging to the back.

Weave back all the other wefts.

Stick the ends of the other wefts to the back of the piece.

Done!

Insert a new silk weft.

Weave it for a few passes.

Add a second weft to the existing weft that is longer.

Weave until you run out of the first silk.  Replace with a new silk weft to add to the existing weft.

Weave until you run out of one of the silk threads and replace with railroad yarn.

End the railroad yarn and replace with silk weft.

Weave a couple of rows of silk weft.

You can continue to play with adding and replacing wefts.  I will be teaching additional techniques but they can be anywhere on this piece.  What we have just woven will actually be the flap of your piece.  Or you can wait until next week and weave along with me.

Combining Beads and Fiber on a Mirrix Loom (with the shedding device)

This tutorial shows you how to do three basic tapestry techniques: Pick and Pick, Wavy Lines, Hatching.


Combining Beads and Fiber on a Mirrix Loom (with the shedding device)

Once you learn to combine beads and fiber, your weaving possibilities are endless. With a shedding device and the right warp spacing, this is easy to do!
For this tutorial, I will be weaving with C-Lon cord as warp, 8/0 beads and a ten dent spring. 
First, warp your loom for tapestry with the shedding device (not bead weaving). This means you will put on warp thread in each dent (space) in your spring. 
 
You can get more detailed warping instructions here, but we’ve gone over the basics below.
 
What do you need? A Mirrix Loom with shedding device and the warping bar, clips and spring bar that came with the loom, a ten-dent spring (this does not come with any loom), heddles, C-Lon cord, beading thread, a needle, a pair of scissors, size 8/0 beads, silk or perle cotton.
 
Place your warping bar between your clips.
 
 Tie your C-Lon cord onto the warping bar. (If your piece is going to be thin, choose a side of the loom and warp on that side.)
 
 Begin warping by bringing your warp thread behind and under the loom to the front.
 
Bring the warp up the front of the loom and into one dent (space) in the spring. 
 
Bring your warp thread over the top of the loom and down the back until you hit the warping bar. When you hit the warping bar, go around the bar and back in the direction you came.  
 
Come back over the top of the loom from the back to the front. Remember to never cross inside the loom, you will always be going around the outside of the loom. Place your warp thread in the next dent over. Continue down the front of the loom. 
 
Go back down the front of the loom, around the bottom bar to the back and up the back until you hit the warping bar. Go around the warping bar and start heading back in the direction you came. 
 
Continue doing this until you’ve warped as wide as you want your piece to be. I warped 5 warps wide. When you are finished, tie on to the warping bar. Make sure your warp threads have even tension. 
 
Move your springs out away from the warping bar and bring the bar down to near the bottom beam.  
 
If you are warping a thin piece, be sure to wrap a ribbon or piece of cord around the warping bar and top and bottom beams to balance the warping bar. (Otherwise it will flop around.)
 
At this point, you may want to tighten your tension slightly. Make sure your warps and not sagging and everything is even. At this time, make sure to slide your spring bar (thin metal bar) into the spring at the top of your loom. This will prevent your warp threads from coming out. 
 
Rotate your clips to the front of the loom. Place your shedding device in your clips.
 
Make sure the hole in the shedding device is on the right side if you are right handed and the left side if you are left handed. 
 
Unscrew the screw on the top of your shedding device and move the silver bar to the side of your warp. 
 
Take a heddle and place it around your first warp thread. 
 
 
Then, slip the ends of the heddle onto the bar. This attaches the warp thread to the shedding device. 
 
Continue doing this with every other warp thread. 
 
When you get to the other edge of your piece, retighten your bar. 
 
Next, flip your shedding device over, bringing the heddles you just put on to the bottom of the shedding device and the other silver bar to the top. 
 
Put heddles on every other warp thread the same way you did with the first bar, but this time put them on every warp thread you didn’t put a heddle on last time. 
 
Retighten your bar. 
 
Place your shedding device handle in the hole on the side of your shedding device. Also remember to swing the brass circle on the clip up over the shedding device to prevent it from falling out. You may need a Philips head screwdriver to do this. 
 
Tighten your tension with your wingnuts. You want it tight but not about-to-break tight. 
 
Place your shedding device handle behind the brass side bar. This creates a shed. Your other shed is created when you move your shedding device handle up (behind the brass bar above the wooden clip) instead of down. 

 

 
Weave a header by taking a length of warp thread and weaving it between the warps while you have the shedding device engaged.  
 
Change your shed. 
 
Weave through your warp threads in the other direction. 
 
Continue doing this, weaving between the warp threads and changing your shed after each pass through.  
Now, you’re ready to add color! 
 
Weave the same way you wove your header. Start your thread in the middle of the piece and bring the end to the back to deal with later. 
 
Keep weaving in this way.
 
Thread some beading thread onto a needle and tie the ends to make a loop. 
 
Put your warp thread (here, my red silk) through the loop of bead thread
 
 
String one fewer bead than the number of warp threads you have onto your needle. (So if I have five warp threads, I use four beads.)
 
Push your beads onto the silk.
 
 
 
Place your beads between the warp threads, weaving them in the same way you weave in your weft.
 
Push the beads down between the warp threads.
 
 
 
Continue to weave with the fiber!

Weave-Along 7, Day One: Silk and Bead Purse

Welcome to Mirrix’s 7th Weave-Along! 





The first step to weaving this fiber and bead purse is to decide how big you want your purse to be. 


My piece will be just big enough to fit an iPhone and a few credit cards. If you are making this piece for another phone or for something else, you may want to make your piece a different size. 


For example, if you plan to use this for a different sized phone, measure the width of the phone and add another inch to the width of the piece.


Then, measure the height of the phone, double that, add an inch and then add two and a half inches for the flap or whatever you decide you want your flap to be.


If your phone is 3 inches wide and 5 inches tall your piece would be 4 inches wide and 13.5 inches tall including the flap. 


When you warp there should be about 10 warps in one inch. (So if your piece is 4 inches wide, you’d warp 40 warps across.)


My piece is warped 40 warps wide using a ten-dent spring. If you are using a twelve dent spring, you will warp the same amount of warps across but when you have finished warping you will loosen your tension slightly, spread your spring out where your piece is (until there are ten spaces in an inch instead of twelve) and then put tension back on the loom. This will make the twelve-dent coil act like a ten-dent coil. 


My piece will be thirteen inches long (including the flap). To accommodate this, the loom is set at about 14 inches high (measure from the bottom of one beam to the top of the other).

Now that you’ve figured out how wide and long your piece will be, it’s time to begin warping!

Have you never warped before? Don’t worry, it’s easy!

For this project we will warp for tapestry with the shedding device. We have detailed warping  instructions here: http://www.mirrixlooms.com/images/warpinginstructions/tapestry.pdf. 

If you have any questions about how wide or long your piece should be or how to do any of these steps, just ask us! Email claudia@mirrixlooms.com or elena@mirrixlooms.com.